Category Archives: New work

Pepperstein at Albertina Museum

Pepperstein is featured in a new exhibition at Albertina Museum in Vienna. From over 10,000 works acquired over the past 18 years the Museum has selected 350 works by 55 artists for this presentation. Pepperstein’s album ‘Day’ (pictured here below) was acquired by Albertina in 2016. The album is a contemplation on the meaning of the Soviet Union’s Great Patriotic War, through the lens of a single day, Victory Day (9th May, 1945).

Pepperstein-Albertina exhibition 1
Image©mariokiesenhofer

Pepperstein-Album Day 13
Image©Pavel Pepperstein

Exhibition showing until 8th October 2017
http://www.albertina.at/en/look_new_acquisitions

A new translation of a short story by Pepperstein (from his book “Spring”)

THE TOLERANT OUTRAGED CUBE

Who ever permitted humans, those arrogant wretches, to snatch other creatures, offhandedly interfere in their business, devour them, kill them, maim them, shit everywhere and fill everything full of filth and poison?

They say that God permitted it. But only humans say that. All right then, I’ll believe it, if at least one non-human confirms it: an ant, a stone, a breeze, a crack, a grain, a waterfall, a gas, an elephant or a piece of ice.

Of course, there are some delightful individuals among humans, especially certain girls and children, as well as enlightened little old women and little old men. The humans can be forgiven a lot for their sake. But even so, on the whole humans are a bunch of demented, conceited, absolute fuckheads, deranged by greed and envy! They brazenly carry on producing more of their own kind, and actually take pride in it, as if it was some kind of good deed. And they’ve congested the entire planet so badly that the ducks and the peaches, as they say, soon won’t have anywhere left to draw breath or fart.

But on the other hand, it’s kind of stupid to be angry with people. Sometimes you can glance into the face of one of the most terrible of them – for instance, a war criminal, a dictator or a serial killer – and that face glimmers with a surprising, childish bewilderment, or the dryness of a splinter of wood, or the dangling fragility of a Christmas tree decoration… It makes you burst into laughter and stop feeling angry with them.

This was the thought of a colossal diamond cube, who was dubbed the “tolerant outraged cube” because his thought flowed so freely and his rage was so irresolute. And what does this cube do? He dances away, performing his cube dance at the centre of some fresh void or other. He wallows blissfully in his own glitterings and shimmerings: sometimes he gets angry, sometimes he turns mellow.

© Pavel Pepperstein, 2010

Hans Ulrich Obrist on Pepperstein

One of the world’s leading curators Hans Ulrich Obrist recently wrote a short review of Pepperstein’s exhibition at Kunsthaus Zug:

PICASSO’S RESURRECTION

If one does not look at the world from mankind’s restricted point of view then categories such as temporality, progress or decay are no longer valid, but everything is permanent and exists side by side.

Naturally it is not very easy to adopt this perspective, in fact it is more or less impossible as we as humans can only see things the way we do. However, there appear to be exceptions. One of them is Pavel Pepperstein. Born in Moscow in 1966, Pepperstein is one of the most important contemporary artists and a pioneer of Russian art who succeeded in freeing his work from the ideological dictates of the Soviet Union’s ‘Socialist realism’. Interestingly, he doesn’t appeal to the alternative canon of Western art, but the young Soviet Union’s belief in progress, according to which almost everything which appeared impossible according to the rules of physics would soon be realized by technical means. For example, the reanimation of the dead – such as Picasso.

The Russian avant-garde didn’t restrict itself to thinking along purely rational lines. Some of them invoked the Christian orthodox philosopher Nikolai Fyodorov, a confidant of Dostoyevsky, who predicted that some day all the Russians who had ever lived would be brought back to life by technical means. One thought cosmically and from a cosmic perspective dates such as 1973, the year of Picasso’s death, or today’s 2017, are fairly irrelevant. And so it happened that Pepperstein—whose artistically minded parents gave him the name of the famous Spaniard—set about artistically resurrecting the role model.

The reincarnation will take place in 3111. However, that we are able to experience it now is due firstly to the Kunsthaus Zug, which has made its rooms available for this purpose, and secondly to Pepperstein’s resolution of the seeming paradox of being able to show an event which will first take place just over a thousand years in the future in the here and now. Like all Russian literature and art which during the decades of dictatorship had to learn to conceal the true in the bizarre, one can only understand Pepperstein’s work if one views it as neither purely serious nor purely amusing. Ultimately this is the case with all avant-garde art: even when it is ahead of its time it is already here today.

This article was originally published in German in Das Magazin, April 2017.  https://www.dasmagazin.ch/2017/04/07/picassos-auferstehung/?reduced=true

Pepperstein at Kunsthaus Zug – exhibition views

Kunsthauszug_Peppenstein_--«oliverbaer-2098

Kunsthauszug_Peppenstein_--«oliverbaer-2093

Kunsthauszug_Peppenstein_--«oliverbaer-2100

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Photos: Kunsthaus Zug, © Oliver Baer

Until 21st May 2017  http://www.kunsthauszug.ch/

Pepperstein at Moscow Triennial

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 Images © Pavel Pepperstein and Nahodka Arts

Павел Пепперштейн на Триеннале российского современного искусства
http://triennial.garagemca.org/?utm_source=main_feature_banner&utm_campaign=triennial&utm_medium=site

Павел Пепперштейн работает над проектом ‘Воскрешение Пабло Пикассо в 3111 году’

Pavel Pepperstein at work on The Resurrection of Pablo Picasso in the Year 3111. Currently on display at Kunsthaus Zug.

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Groys on Pepperstein

Boris Groy’s essay on Pavel Pepperstein reproduced below with kind permission of Julie Saul Gallery:

The Greek Afternoons of Jacqueline Kennedy

Contemporary celebrity culture permanently confronts us with the images of politicians, sportsmen, actors or singers who seem to be totally reduced to their public roles. This inevitably provokes in the reader or spectator the desire to look behind the surface – and to discover real persons behind the formulaic media figures. The attempts to satisfy this desire produce numerous memoirs, documentaries and “true stories” told by “authentic witnesses”. However, all these documentaries and memoirs only add new narratives to the mythology that media has already created around celebrity figures. Thus, the desire of “private” and “human” remains forever unsatisfied and merely serves the media letting its mythology grow. The new series of drawings by Pavel Pepperstein exploits and at the same time ironize this desire. Pepperstein pretends to present the unknown drawings by Jacqueline Kennedy that allegedly were made by her after the death of Aristotle Onassis – drawings that reveal her secret desires and obsessions. However, these drawings refer to nothing personal or private. Rather, Pepperstein relates the myth surrounding Jacqueline Kennedy with other myths and thus creates a network, a rhizome of mythological references and connections. Instead to reveal a private person behind the myth the artist integrates this myth into the tradition of Eastern and Western mythology – from antique Greece to the Cold War.

In the context of Pepperstein’s drawings USA and USSR are presented as enemy twins that are more intimately connected than divided by their ideological and political conflict. Lee Harvey Oswald and his Soviet wife Marina connect the death of John Kennedy to the long history of American vs. Soviet intrigues and conspiracies. However, Pepperstein is less interested in the Cold War itself than in the fact that after the assassination of John Kennedy Jacqueline moved from the USA to Greece. Greece is, of course, a place where Western mythology originated. It was a sensual, erotic mythology that celebrated sexual desire and at the same time stoicism in the face of death. This erotic aspect of Greek mythology builds an obvious contrast with American Protestantism – and Pepperstein plays with this contrast. Jacqueline looks as a big fish when she is carried to the see by Greeks who look more like servants than captors. But at the same time she appears very small compared to the head of Athena who symbolizes the wisdom and power of the Greek state tradition. On the head of Athena is an owl that has the eyes that represent the sign of infinity.  But on another drawing “Noon on Scorpios Island” we see a scene that obviously refers to the poem of Mallarme “The Afternoon of a Faun” that celebrates the ephemeral, fleeting character of erotic dreams. But to an even greater degree it refers to the eponymous ballet choreographed by Vaclav Nijinsky – one of the highlights of the famous “Ballets Russes” performed in Paris in 1912.

But, of course, Jacqueline came not to antique Greece but to the Greece dominated by Orthodox Christianity – the faith that it shares with Russia. Thus, a sojourn in Greece meant for the Jackie of Pepperstein’s drawings not only a vacation in the paradise of erotic dreams but also a cultural space that was and still is religiously and culturally alternative to the West. The drawings reflect this ambivalence of Jackie’s Greek experience: to their main protagonists belong the centaurs that display their “material bottom”, as the Russian philosopher Mikhail Bakhtin would say, but also their torsos and heads covered in the manner of the Christian Orthodox priests or monks. Now, Pepperstein makes obvious that the whole Greek mythological world can be easily destroyed by the American supremacy attacking it from the skies. Thus, “Mr. America”can relax and drink a glass of wine that looks like a glass of blood – and could also be the Holy Grail. However, even here Pepperstein remains ambivalent: the geometrical forms symbolizing the American attack remind one, of course, of the Suprematist paintings by Kazimir Malevich that can be seen as symbols of the Russian avant-garde and, actually, also of the Russian revolution.

Thus, the chains of mythological associations that are displayed by Pepperstein’s drawings do not serve to elucidate or clarify anything at all. From the beginning of his artistic career Pepperstein practiced polemics against psychoanalysis. The psychoanalysis subjects the free play of associations to a certain goal – to reveal some real facts behind the private mythologies of the patients like the people who try to find the private facts behind the public mythologies of celebrities. Pepperstein, on the contrary, uses the technique of free associations to get rid of any interpretive control and therapeutic goal. Jackie begins to fabulate and associate precisely to escape the control by menacing, terrifying – when also purely phantasmic – figures of the psychoanalytical doctors. In his young years, in the 1980s, Pepperstein belonged to the (post)conceptualist group “Inspection Medical Hermeneutics”. The artists of “Medical Hermeneutics” practiced precisely this kind of free play of associations devoid of any practical goal – to get rid of any kind of ideological control. In so doing they were radicalizing the positions of such Moscow Conceptualist artists of the older generation as Ilya Kabakov or Andrei Monastyrski. These artists presented their artworks as starting points for a play for associations and interpretations into which the audience was also involved. It was the diversity and heterogeneity of interpretations that was consequently aestheticized by the artists, i.e. became that field in which artistic activity in fact took place, so that these interpretations and illustrations were themselves transformed into the artworks. The premise for such aesthetization of theoretical and therapeutic interpretations of artistic activity is, naturally, a total loss of faith in their effective explanatory force. The “Medical Hermeneutic” diagnosed health as the more radical form of illness – and used art as a means to cure this illness. The alleged drawings by Jacqueline Kennedy are a good example of this anti-psychoanalytical cure.

Boris Groys, philosopher and art critic, February 19, 2017

Pepperstein in New York

PP NY BoothPepperstein’s exhibition at the prestigious ADAA Annual Show succeeded in provoking a reaction (see links). The Secret Drawings of Jacqueline Kennedy, a multi-dimensional project bringing together video, short-story, fashion and art, employs mise en abyme in a wide-ranging exploration of modern myth and ancient mythology. But for some New Yorkers there remains a comforting haze around the memory and image of Jackie O. Like children we demand that our heroes should be fleckless, and easily believe them so. This is why painting icons has never been straightforward as Manet discovered when he refused to idealise Christ.

http://theartnewspaper.com/market/art-fairs/female-artists-make-their-presence-felt-at-adaa-art-show-/

https://www.artsy.net/article/artsy-editorial-9-booths-new-yorks-adaa

The Art Show: When Contemporary Art Is Uninspiring, Dealers Turn to History

PP NY Booth 3

PP NY Booth 2
Courtesy of Julie Saul Gallery

The resurrection of Pablo Picasso in the year 3111

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Image © Pavel Pepperstein

The 19th century Russian philosopher Nikolai Fedorov believed that humanity should focus all its efforts on one task – the resurrection of the dead with the help of scientific and technical progress. It is the year 3111 and Fyodorov’s utopia has finally been realized, and many years after his physical death, science has been used to bring Pablo Picasso back to life. His enthusiasm undimmed, the resurrected artist begins work immediately, wishing to recreate the erotic games of his nymphs and centaurs. Picasso imagined himself and his genius as immortal in his creations. His cult of vital eroticism needed no scientific resurrection – Eros doesn’t fear death, he feels himself equal to her: each mating, each lovers’ kiss, every erection, each orgasm, every stroke of paint on canvas – all of this means more than billions of ghosts. So after his experience of death, what fantasies does he conjure for the nymphs and centaurs? He reproduces his old work, but something in it has changed – the nymphs and centaurs have become more abstract, and acquired a sort of “cosmic resonance.”

Pavel Pepperstein
The resurrection of Pablo Picasso in the year 3111

The exhibition will be open at Kunsthaus Zug from 26th February until 21 May 2017 http://www.kunsthauszug.ch

 

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The Secret Drawings of Jacqueline Kennedy

Pepperstein’s debut exhibition in America will open on 28th February 2017 at the Art Dealers Association of America annual Art show. The exhibition is being presented by Julie Saul Gallery of New York (www.saulgallery.com)

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The Secret Drawings of Jacqueline Kennedy
ADAA The Art Show February 28- March 5, 2017
Park Avenue Armory at 66th St.

Season’s Greetings and Happy New Year from Pavel Pepperstein!

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Image © Pavel Pepperstein & Xenia Dranysh

Inspection Medical Hermeneutics enters permanent collection of Pompidou

An early work by Inspection Medical Hermeneutics has been added to the permanent collection of Centre Georges Pompidou (Paris). The installation Side Space of the Sacred in the USSR (aka Amber Room) was acquired by Pompidou as part of the recent gift of contemporary Russian masterpieces from The Vladimir Potanin Foundation. Side Space of the Sacred was created and first exhibited in Vienna in 1992.

Inspection Medical Hermeneutics was a pioneering artists’ collective formed in December 1987 in a squat in Furman Lane in Moscow. The founding members of the group were Pavel Pepperstein, Sergei Anufriev, and Yuri Leiderman. The group created installations and performances which experimented with language and meaning, imagining their work as an investigation into Russian culture at a time of increasing foreign influence following the break-up of the Soviet Union.

The Potanin Foundation gift is currently on exhibition at the Pompidou. The exhibition ‘Collection! Contemporary art in the USSR and Russia, 1950-2000’ will run from 14th Sept until 27th March 2017, after which the pieces will be added to the museum’s permanent collection.

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Side Space of the Sacred in the USSR
Image © Inspection Medical Hermeneutics

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Side Space of the Sacred in the USSR, detail
Image © Inspection Medical Hermeneutics

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Side Space of the Sacred in the USSR, detail
Image © Inspection Medical Hermeneutics

 

 

  

 

‘Jewel’ at Art Basel

In a generally downbeat review of this year’s Art Basel, the critic Ari Akkermans describes Pepperstein as a ‘jewel’ among a lot of dying and dead stars: “Amid tons upon tons of repetitive work, there were some unexpected jewels to be found. These included the paintings and drawings of Russian conceptualist Pavel Pepperstein at Kewenig”.  The full article can be read here: http://hyperallergic.com/306912/hints-of-the-real-world-in-art-basels-elitist-bubble/

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Pepperstein-Art Basel 2
(Both photos by Yelena Walker)

New exhibition “The Suprematic Bible” @ Loushy | Art & Projects

Pepperstein-Suprematic Bible 1
Image © Pavel Pepperstein

Pepperstein-Suprematic Bible 2
Image © Pavel Pepperstein

Pepperstein-Suprematic Bible 4
Image © Pavel Pepperstein

The exhibition will be open until 24 July 2016

Loushy   | Art & Projects  www.loushy.com

 

 

Pepperstein @ ArtBasel 2016

Pepperstein’s primary dealer Kewenig Galerie displayed several of his works at ArtBasel 2016. The works here below, Endless American Flag and Khrushchev’s Speech to the UN General Assembly, deal with the theme of cold war politics and are suggestive of the posturing and self-aggrandisement which accompanied US-Soviet relations in contemporary history.

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Endless American Flag on the Moon, acryl on canvas, 150 x 200 cm, 2015

 

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Khrushchev’s Speech to the UN General Assembly, acryl on canvas, 150 x 200 cm, 2015

Images © Pavel Pepperstein. Photo by Eric Tschernow, Berlin

Kewenig Galerie, Art Basel 15-18 June, Hall 2.0/D5 https://www.artbasel.com/catalog/gallery/

“Memory is over”- new exhibition at PLATO – platform for contemporary art, Ostrava

Pepperstein-Memory is over, exhibition view 1
Image © PLATO, Ostrava

Pepperstein-Memory is over, exhibition view 2
Image © PLATO, Ostrava

Pepperstein-Memory is over, exhibition view 3
Image © PLATO, Ostrava

The exhibition will be open until 21 August 2016.

Pavel Pepperštejn:

 

 

Galerie Iragui presents Pepperstein at Art Brussels 2016

A History of Futuristic Hallucinations.

In this series, curated by Pepperstein’s Moscow-based dealer Galerie Iragui, various personages from the past (saints, slaves, neanderthals, Ancient Roman senators, frauleins, Indian and Buddhist ascetics, exalted ladies of the 19th century, British colonial generals, Russian cosmists, prostitutes, monks, kings and the like) are captured in those thrilling moments in their lives when a vision of the distant future opens up before them. The result is a meditation on the connexions between different periods of time, between dates in the past and in the future – connexions which harness the hallucinatory potential of the human consciousness.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAImage © Pavel Pepperstein

The images of the future appear suddenly and unexpectedly, of no apparent use to anybody, and yet manage to bluntly interject themselves into the aesthetic fabric of everyday life, bringing with them elements of other aesthetic codes. Before our eyes the symbolic languages that have been partially forgotten, the languages that we have largely lost the ability to understand, intertwine with languages of which we know nothing and about which we can only have a foreboding. A suprema or a shell floating up from the depths of an ocean can both be a mode of transport allowing the past and the future to consort with one another behind the back of the present moment, which is all too bewitched by itself.

Text © Pavel Pepperstein, 31.01.2016

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA  Image © Pavel Pepperstein

Galerie Iraguie, Art Brussels 21-24 April 2016, Booth A12. http://www.iragui.com/en/Artists

Pepperstein Expands into the Fashion World

Russian Vogue recently visited the studio of Pavel Pepperstein, in Moscow, to document his new and exciting foray into the world of high-fashion. Pepperstein has launched his brand – ‘Pepperstein’ – and is thrilled to be expanding his talents into the fashion-scene.

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Pepperstein and his muse Kseniya Dranysh (dress: Monument to the Yellow Colour) in his Moscow studio.

Image©Vogue Russia

Pepperstein-Vogue 1, 2016

Pepperstein’s bold and unique style. From left to right: dress: Column; dress: Fir-tree; jacket: Future-Landscape

Image©Vogue Russia

Exhibition at ‘Ekaterina’ in Moscow

Works by Pepperstein are on display at an exhibition of contemporary Russian art at the Art Fund ‘Ekaterina’ in Moscow. ‘Ekaterina’ is the personal collection of Vladimir & Ekaterina Seminikhin. The fund owns several works by Pepperstein including Flag on the landscape and America. In a recent interview Vladimir Seminikhin said: “Pepperstein is undoubtedly gifted…and it is clear that he holds a unique place in the history of Russian art”.

The exhibition will run until 31st July: http://www.ekaterina-foundation.ru/rus/

 

 

 

 

Permanent Pepperstein wall-painting at the Hermitage

The Hermitage Museum in St Petersburg has added a wall-painting by Pepperstein to its permanent collection. The work is called ‘The Convict’ (Уголовник). The painting was originally produced on canvas for his solo exhibition at Pace London. When the renowned curator Kasper Konig saw it, he asked Pepperstein to reproduce it on the wall at Mainfesta 10 in 2014. Hermitage liked it so much they decided to acquire it from the artist and keep it permanently on display. (The original is now in a private collection).

Pepperstein-Convinct. Manifesta 10. 2014Image © Pavel Pepperstein

 

‘Hunters of the marble heads’ – Pepperstein exhibition at The Russian Academy of Fine Arts Museum, St Petersburg

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Hunters of the marble heads (archaeology of the future).

In about 50 years from now (i.e. somewhere in 2066) people all over the world will start finding in the most unexpected places marble heads, like fragments of some graven image. The attention of researchers will immediately be drawn to the following circumstances:

  1. It will be impossible to establish when the heads (the so-called ‘x heads’) were made, even using the most advanced technology.
  2. Even though the heads will look like they have broken off from statues, nobody will be able to find the other parts of the marble body.

An entire caste of seekers of these mysterious heads will spring up and enter the collective consciousness as ‘the hunters of the marble heads’. Many violent and not so violent disputes will break out over the discoveries. Scientists and other curiously-minded folk will put forward a variety of hypotheses about the heads, some quite audacious. One hypothesis will say these heads are not from the past but from the future. Another version will claim that the ‘x heads’ are the work of aliens. But it will remain unclear why aliens, or people of the future, had needed to flood the Earth with these fragmentary sculptures. The number of heads found will steadily increase, ‘x head’ museums will appear in different cities across the world, and a market will emerge where these strange artefacts, possessing neither author nor history, will circulate.

The lack of legend associated with these pseudo fragments will be offset by the influence that the ‘x heads’ will assume over real people. By getting close to the heads the sick will be cured whilst some will claim that physical proximity to the artefacts enhances their minds with telepathic or clairvoyant abilities. There will be many myths and adventure stories about the ‘the hunters of the marble heads’. Representatives from all walks of life will pour into this special caste which will be shrouded in an atmosphere of legend and daring exploits.

Today, from the perspective of 2016, it would be presumptuous to describe in detail the process of finding the heads and their impact on mankind. Our goal is modest: we want only to hint at those phenomena (e.g. bifurcation of time) which will soon face the earth’s inhabitants.

For many centuries sculpture has been the ‘focus and likeness of neurosis’ in the words of Sigmund Freud. The toppling and destruction of statues has long meant much more than the statues themselves. The world is littered with their fragments, and, who knows, maybe not only the past but also the distant future contributes to the inexhaustible archaeological layer, capable of serving up more and more surprises.

© Pavel Pepperstein, 2016

The exhibition will be open until 28 February 2016.

http://www.nimrah.ru/exhibitions/current/760/

The Cold Center of the Sun. Short stories by Pavel Pepperstein (published by Hatje Cantz)

NEW TITLE INFORMATION
The Cold Center of the Sun
Short Stories
Pavel Pepperstein
Introduction by Lorand Hegyi, Olga Sviblova, Texts by Pavel Pepperstein

English, French, Russian
112 pages, 62 illustrations

19.60 x 27.00 cm, softcover
ISBN 978-3-7757-4066-1

Pepperstein-catalogue cover The Cold Center of the Sun

This catalogue containing seven short stories with illustrations is available for purchase from Nahodka Arts at a price £23.00 (sterling). Please send requests via the ‘Get in touch’ on this site.

Other publications by Pepperstein

The Great Defeat and the Great Rest. Poetry. Obskuri Viri, Moscow, 1993.
Old Man’s diet. Ad Marginem, Moscow, 1998.
The Mythological Love of Castes (vol 1 with S. Anufriev). Ad Maginem, Moscow, 1999.
The Mythological Love of Castes (2 vols). Ad Maginem, Moscow, 2000
Interpretation of Dreams (with V. Mazin). Novoye Literaturnoye Obozrenie, 2005
War Stories. Ad Marginem, Moscow, 2006
The Swastika and The Pentagon. Ad Marginem, Moscow, 2006
Spring (Vesna). Ad Marginem, Moscow, 2010
Prague Night. Albatros Media a.s., Prague, 2011
Prague Night. Artwords Press, London, 2014

Pepperstein is currently exhibiting at Kewenig Galerie, exhibition “Abstract Memories” ( http://kewenig.com/)

‘Abstract memories’- Pepperstein’s new exhibition at Kewenig Galerie.

Sculpture

‘Flying Shell’ or the Monument of Ammonites!

Modern scientific research shows that there was a period in the history of the Earth that lasted for about a million years when the only form of life on the planet were giant seashells, called ‘ammonites’. The planet in those days was completely covered with water, and ammonites hung in the thickness of the world’s oceans, near the surface, feeding on the sun’s energy, joined to the ocean floor by their long stem-tails. They slowly drifted in the ocean waters as far as their stems would allow, and, according to my hypothesis, this million year period of the earth’s history was in fact a golden age, a time of earthly paradise, a time of absolute peace, enlightened tranquillity and harmony.

I think ammonites were endowed with the highest intelligence and were able to communicate with each other at a distance, and as far as I can tell, all subsequent philosophical activity of mankind is but a faint echo of their profound conversation. Their minds were so perfect that they required no further development. They didn’t need things to be happening, nor did they provoke history, and I suspect that their wisdom, like the green waters in which they were blissfully happy, reflects the subsequent turns of the earth’s history, including the long-term future, about which we so far still know nothing. Nostalgia for the great civilization of the Ammonites, as a manifestation of a certain embryonic human memory, has at times appeared in human culture and aesthetics. One may at least recall those periods for which the word ‘shell’ (rocco) was the root – Baroque, Rococo.

This sculpture is a draft monument to the great civilization of the Ammonites. The living, rustling tail connects the shell to the earth, she herself floating in the air, all knowing, without embarrassment, not knowing fear, regret, greed, anger, and craving for perfection. But she has already achieved perfection. And meditating in her direction, we will be able at least to a small degree to tune into her essence and virtue. The Shell will never leave us, she is always with us, she is the focal point of our brain. The most mysterious organ called the ‘middle ear’ or ‘snail-shell’. And, thanks to its presence in our body and in our soul, the most absurd and vile thoughts are balanced-out by the rustle of the ocean waves, constituting our ‘musical unconscious’.

© Pavel Pepperstein, 2016

Photograph by Nils-R. Schultze. www.schultze-krause.de

The exhibition will be open until 16th April 2016. http://kewenig.com/

 

 

 

Artists 4 Paris climate 2015. Pepperstein imagines a new way to travel – safe and enviromentaly friendly

Pepperstein-Cloud-Planes in the Year 2066, 2014

Cloud-Planes in the Year 2066

Image © Pavel Pepperstein

In 2064 a group of aerospace engineers working under the direction of a certain E., successfully launched production of the so-called  ‘cloud-planes’ – and after a while all civilian passenger flights were switched over to the new technology.

E. suggested dividing the propulsion units and the passenger module into two autonomous assemblies, connected on the tug-boat principle by a special hawser equipped with hyper-responsive sensors (the material for the hawser was created in 2049). If a breakdown or malfunction occurs in the propulsion section, the hawser is uncoupled mechanically. The passenger module is composed of a jelly-like, transparent, but exceptionally strong material, permeated with nano-capillaries. The form of the module changes in flight, according to the dynamics of the air currents, but it most often resembles a spindle-shaped cloud, with elements of a flying tree seed. Left all alone in the sky, the passenger module goes into free fall through the air, descending to the ground very slowly. The material for the passenger module was synthesised in 2022. This material is so ductile and strong that it allows the module (the so-called ‘snot’) to land in the sea or on a mountain crest. And even if the ‘snot cloud’ descends onto sharp rocks, no mountain peak can puncture it, and all the passengers wait imperturbably for a rescue vehicle that will take the ‘cloud’ in tow…

 

© Pavel Pepperstein, 2010

Pepperstein’s science fiction short story Cloud Planes can be downloaded from: http://www.artists4parisclimate2015.com/en/artists/pavel-pepperstein/

 

The Albertina Museum in Vienna has acquired Pepperstein’s album ‘Day’

Pepperstein’s Album Day is dedicated to 9th May, 1945, marking the Red Army’s final defeat of Nazism. Pepperstein-Day 13

Image © Pavel Pepperstein

The Album as an artistic medium originated in Moscow in the early 1970s, to combine text and image. An Album is normally comprised of several separate sheets of paper (not bound) with original drawings and text. This is not the only type of Album. As well as image and text, there are text only Albums, purely figurative Albums, and abstract Albums. What unites all these styles is that every Album has a concept – an idea that it wants to communicate to the viewer. More than other art forms, the Album is an attempt to educate and persuade, as well as entertain. The co-founders of this genre are Viktor Pivovarov and Ilya Kabakov; early adopters and exponents of the genre include Oleg Vasiliev, Nikita Alexeev, Pavel Pepperstein, Yuri Leiderman.